Providing high quality neonatal care to babies and their families

 

The North West Neonatal Operational Delivery Network (NWNODN)  aims to provide high quality neonatal care to babies and their families. Within the NWNODN there are twenty-two neonatal units and one neonatal transport service all providing twenty-four hour care for sick and premature neonates.The work undertaken by the NWNODN is clinician led with the best interest of neonates and their families at the heart of all we undertake.

Latest NWNODN Facebook Posts

Well done to the Neonatal Unit at Preston. A fantastic team and well deserved. ⭐️Today, we are celebrating 5 of our teams who have received the Gold STAR (Safety Triangulation Accreditation Review), which recognises excellence in improving standards in staff feedback and inclusion, patient experience, documentation and the environment.

The teams who have achieved the Gold standard today are the Neonatal Unit, Preston Birth Centre, Day Case Theatres at Royal Preston Hospital, Chest Clinic at Royal Preston Hospital and Interventional Radiology.

Our Governors have proved instrumental in the design and implementation of STAR, dedicating their time, feedback and constructive criticism to raising our quality standards across the organisation and improving staff and patient experience.

Thank you to each and every person involved in STAR, and a huge congratulations and well done goes to our wonderful teams who are going above and beyond every day. You are amazing!
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Up to 80% of parents who experience neonatal care will struggle with their mental health. For those parents living in the Greater Manchester area you can find more information on Trauma support on the spoons charity website. www.spoons.org.ukHaving a baby is always a big change to your life, but spending time in neonatal care is something most parents do not expect. It can also follow a sudden, sometimes traumatic birth, and as a result many parents can suffer from symptoms of trauma or PTSD. Whatever you have been through, or what you are feeling, it’s important to get support.

It’s not just mums who have given birth who can suffer from symptoms of trauma or PTSD. Partners can also suffer with symptoms, especially if they’ve seen their partner go through a traumatic birth, or they’ve faced very difficult and upsetting situations on the unit.

Find out more about post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) here: buff.ly/2RaOdzz

You can contact us at for information and emotional support.
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Thank you to all the neonatal teams, not only in Lancs & South Cumbria but across the whole region.To our neonatal staff; Thank you for: innovating & improving services, enabling parents & babies to be close together, raising the importance of breastfeeding & breast milk to families, providing access to donor breast milk where mum's milk is unavailable #LSCInfantFeeding ... See MoreSee Less

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Mental health services are available to those who need support 🤱🤰 ... See MoreSee Less

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A neonatal unit can sometimes be a scary place at the start of a family’s journey. There will be lots of equipment and medical terminology that parents may not be familiar with. Bliss have up-dated their website to include some of the words & abbreviations parents may hear once their baby is admitted. As part of FiCare encouraging parents to be actively involved in all care, including ward rounds, is essential so knowing what the medical jargon means may help but parents should always be comfortable asking the doctors and nurses for an explanation. For more parent information you can also visit the NWNODN website at www.neonatalnetwork.co.ukWhen you first arrive on the neonatal unit, you may hear many medical or abbreviated words that you have not heard before. This can feel confusing and overwhelming. We have a list of terms and their meanings on our website that you may come across, that might help: buff.ly/3bajYSx ... See MoreSee Less

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A massive shout out to all our PAG volunteers.
Your advice, ideas, commitment and support to other parents is amazing. Thank you for everything you do. ⭐️
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Latest News

UCLAN Audit Study on Understanding Parental Psychosocial Support in NNUs Launched

  UCLAN are keen to hear from all neonatal units in the UK. Please click on the link below to access the survey . https://uclan.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eFeYRRXCkZuJJXf

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BAPM Consultation on Therapeutic Hypothermia

The consultation is now open on ‘Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neonatal Encephalopathy – A BAPM Framework for Practice.‘ The framework covers case selection, parent / carer communication, infants who fall outside of…

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Remote Support for Neonatal Families during Covid19

The NWNODN have put together a list of remote sources of support for those parents who are struggling with mental health issues, feeding or just feel they would benefit from…

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COVID-19 Latest

NW units will be briefed regularly and have been advised to follow the RCPCH & BAPM guidance, which can be accessed together at the link below. If you are a…

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Wigan Neonatal Unit Re-accredited for BFI

A massive well-done to everyone on the Wigan NNU as they are not only the first (& only) unit in the NW to gain full Neonatal BFI Accreditation but they…

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Sue Snowdon – NNA Nurse of the Year Runner Up

Susan Snowdon, Neonatal Induction Programme Manager, NWNODN is National Neonatal Nurse of the Year runner up (Neonatal Nurse Association) in recognition of her contribution to the education and development of…

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Neonatal Nursing 3rd Edition the new “Boxwell”

We have always known that there is so much experience and knowledge in neonatal care in the North West and it is highlighted in this edition of Boxwell which has…

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Join the Neonatal Nurses Association (NNA)

The Neonatal Nurses Association (NNA) http://www.nna.org.uk/ The Neonatal Nurses Association was established over 40 years ago in 1977 by Beryl Chadney, a senior nurse at the Department of Health. She selected a…

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Upcoming Events

    Find your local Unit

    Hospitals often have a unit or ward dedicated to caring for babies who require additional support after birth, which cannot be provided on the Maternity wards.

    These are often referred to in different ways such as the Special Care Baby Unit (SCBU), Neonatal Unit (NNU) or Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

    NWNODN working in close collaboration with:

    Keep up-to-date by downloading the latest national publications